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20130126
20130126
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> pakistan and other countries have been targets of drone strikes used in counter-terrorism operations by the u.s. now the united nations is investigating the implications of unmanned aircraft. our reporter in bangkok has the details. >>> the office of the u.n. high commissioner for human rights is assigning a group of specialists to review drone attacks. it announced on thursday that the team will look into the legality of drones and their affect on civilians. the united states has used remote controlled, unmanned aircraft to carry out strikes against armed militants in countries including pakistan, afghanistan and yemen. the u.n. special repertoire on human rights and counterterrorism announces that the inquiry will focus on the civilian impact of the use of drones and other forms of targeted killing. it will do a critical examination of civilian casualties with a view to making recommendations to the u.n. general assembly. pakistanis are growing increasingly critical of the attacks. they claim they are a violation of their country's sovereignty and have killed many civilians. a spok
was talking about that young man from dubai, or from pakistan, one of 66 countries, 77 countries perhaps where it is still illegal and a crime to be gay. and stewart was talking about the idea that in that airport in dubai, or in pakistan, that that young man who happens to be gay, or that young woman who happens to be lesbian sees on that board, that flight to san francisco, mentions harvey milk, san francisco international airport. the hope is that just like harvey gave hope to that young man from altuna, pennsylvania, we as a city can give hope to that young man and had young woman from the 77 countries. the timing is especially important for me as a member of the lgbt community. we are at a crossroads in history of lgbt right in this country. in a few months our united states supreme court will be deciding a number of cases that at their core go to the very question of whether or not we as members of the lgbt community are equal under the constitution and under the laws of this country. and what a better time for the city and county of san francisco to send a message that recognizes the
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
against the united states in a country like pakistan and each at, which are large recipients of the public majority that is military, but there is a very powerful sentiment that this evil don't like us. they take our money and burn our flag. luscious cut them off. obviously there's been resolutions and so forth. talk about how you respond to you think the country how to respond to that very powerful sentiment. >> well, the common thread here is the presence of al qaeda and its affiliates in the threat that poses to the world from the standpoint of stability and peaceful transition of government. we are reminded that almost every day and it's a crested that sweeps across the middle of the world, starting in indignation at coming across northern africa and now moving down to the sub-saharan parts of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we've seen ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre-9/11 leads to dire consequences potentially for americans. it is true the american public is more weary, but nevertheless we are reminded every day that works and journalists -- >>
essential for taking on taliban and al qaeda forces in an accessible regions in afghanistan, pakistan, and yemen. but given the number of innocent civilians killed by unmanned u.s. drones, the german government is under pressure to justify why it needed these weapons to carry out targeted killings. >> that's a good question. more on this with our correspondent at our parliamentary studios. why is germany considering this? >> the government itself and the military in germany say that these weapons are very precise, and they enable the armed forces to attack rapidly and precisely. there is, of course, more to it than that. they are also a lot cheaper than, for example, fighter jets. the army is going through restructuring at the moment. it has budget cuts, and it is also in need of reauthorization. britain, of course, has armed jones. it will use them in afghanistan. italy, which has already reconnaissance drones, is going to upgrade them. there's also some talk of a european combined program. >> this was touched on in the report. our civilian deaths the reason this is so controversial?
changes in the blood. a patient comes back after treatment a year later for a pakistan -- a pet span, we will be able to catch things and minds for them before they occur. we can stop the cancer before it stops -- we can stop the cancer before it starts again. >> previously here las vegas you were quoted as saying that we are making progress to ultimately make the google map of the cell. what does that mean? >> imagine the l.a. highway. imagine a blueprint been developed at a downtown los angeles architectural firm and then being out in beautiful laguna beach. and a courier can hit the 405, the 33, the 401. the blueprint has to get to the manufacturing to get the cancer protein is made. the goal mouth of the cell is being able to look -- the google map of the cell is being able to look at the cell and put that out on top of the cell. the dna is where the cancer is. the rna follows protein highway systems to get through the cell to the area that makes the bad proteins. when technology comes together, we can begin to understand that it is difficult to change the blueprint. but what we can
and more drone togs the sky. the united states has committed 340 drone strikes in pakistan with eight of those coming in the last 30 days n. yemen and somalia, there have been 55 drone strikes and seven of those in the last 30 days. the president's use of drones raises questions and criticiss s and inspired nyu jerome headley to gather new data. 25 specific drone strikes will be investigated, and an action praised by the proponents of the program.y spencer, you have written a ton on this, and what should we be thinking of the new technology for waging war? >> more about the platform and less about the strategy that it implements and to some degree accelerates, and what i mean by that is that the drone, itself, is not qualitatively a transformational thing in warfare. we are basically talking about aerial bombardment and using a smaller weapon to do it, and that size is just going to shrink, so you have less power applied to a particular target, but when you look at the thing and how it is applied, it is not so much different if the pilot is thousands of miles away rather nan in the co
is david headley. he was born in the united states. his mother is american. his father is from pakistan. the thing that made david headley most valuable to the terrorist groups that trained him was that he was an american, which meant that he could travel easily all over the world without attracting suspicion thanks to his american passport. when the ten attackers arrived in india for the mumbai terrorist attack, none of them had ever been to that city before, but they were able to pull off this highly coordinated, highly mobile multisite attack in a strange city they didn't know because of david headley. they knew exactly where to go because david headley had scouted everything for them. he had given them meticulously prepared videos and reports and gps coordinates about how to wage that assault on that city in november 2008. david headley was not arrested until almost a year after the attack in october 2009. u.s. officials picked him up at o'hare airport in chicago when he was en route to denmark in the midst of planning a second mumbai-style attack. the attack in denmark was going to
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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